#444 The V-Word (Rebroadcast)

This week, we're looking at the social and biological science of female sex organs. We'll talk to Dr. Anthony Atala, director of the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center Institute for Regenerative Medicine, about the creation and use of lab-grown vaginas. Biology professor Marie Herberstein exposes the bias against female genitalia in scientific studies. And science writer Emily Anthes tells us about the history and promising future of female condoms. 

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Artful Science: Learning by drawing

One of my favorite things about being an artist is getting to learn about other people’s science. For example, in the past couple of years, I’ve learned: about traditional ecological knowledge relating to caribou genetics (link) several fish species build nests (link; my take) citizen science is helping Wyoming biologists track amphibian populations (link) bees … Continue reading Artful Science: Learning by drawing

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Episode 82: Dinosaurs of China

‘Dinosaurs of China’ at Wollaton Hall, Nottingham, UK,  is a one-time only world exclusive exhibition of dinosaurs. Featuring fossils and specimens never before seen outside of Asia, the collection brings to life the story of how dinosaurs evolved into the birds that live alongside us today. With its curators, Dr Adam Smith and Dr Wang Qi, we’re provided with insights into how this exhibition was pulled off and are given a full guided tour. For…

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#443 Batteries

This week on Science for the People we take a deep dive into modern batteries: how they work now and how they might work in the future. We speak with Gerbrand Ceder from UC Berkeley, about the most commonly used batteries today, how they work, and how they could work better. And we talk with Kathryn Toghill, electrochemist from Lancaster University, about redox flow batteries and how they could help make our power grids more…

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Atlantic salmon infographic: Tracking Smolt – Emily S. Damstra

The autumn 2017 issue of Atlantic Salmon Journal included a complex two-page illustration I created to help explain the life cycle of Atlantic salmon and how Atlantic Salmon Federation biologists catch smolt (young salmon), outfit them with transmitters, release and then track them in order to learn why so many never return to three Gulf of St. Lawrence rivers. Tracking Smolt illustration © Emily S. Damstra The illustration is entirely digital. As with any commission, I love…

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Sketching Tip: Sketching your notes at conferences, meetings & in class

These tips are excerpted from an earlier article I wrote highlighting many ways that sketchnotes are being used by scientists. The following tips, though, are broadly applicable for many kinds of note-taking situations. Keep your supplies simple and portable. A ballpoint pen and one color (marker, colored pencil, even a crayon!) can produce delightful results. … Continue reading Sketching Tip: Sketching your notes at conferences, meetings & in class

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#442 From Nobel to Ig Nobel

The Nobel prizes are, well, the Nobel prize of prizes! One of the most elite prizes in the world. But where did they come from, why do they matter, and how do they influence the practice of science? This week we speak with medical historian Nils Hansson and sociologist of science Harriet Zuckerman about the origin and legacy of the Nobel Prizes, and what might help them be more representative of science in the future.…

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