#427 The Life Project

This week we're diving deep into the history and current state of some of the largest and longest running studies in the world. We speak with science journalist, Chief Magazine Editor for Nature, and author Helen Pearson about her book "The Life Project: The Extraordinary Story of 70,000 Ordinary Lives" and the history of the long-running series of British longitudinal cohort studies. And we'll talk with Professor Parminder Raina about the Canadian Longitudinal Study on…

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Losing weight, increasing fitness in old age

After my last article on intermittent fasting, which you can read below, a reader contacted me to ask what can older people do to lose weight? What’s the best form of exercise? Well here’s the answer. My latest for the Montreal Gazette: http://montrealgazette.com/opinion/opinion-losing-weight-increasing-fitn... **************************************** The other day I got an email from a reader who had a bone to pick with me regarding my article on intermittent fasting. He asked me why all my articles were…

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Neovenator Neurovasculature and the Purpose of Sensitive Snouts

Articles on dinosaur neurovasculature are like buses: you wait for most of the Phanerozoic for one to arrive and then two appear at once. Indeed, 2017 saw the publication of two articles relating to the purpose of cephalic neurovasculature in theropod dinosaurs, the subject being only briefly highlighted in a select few cases from disparate Mesozoic reptiles. Thanks to micro-focus computed tomography (μCT), our discovery of complex internal canals within the rostrum (snout) of Neovenator…

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Neovenator Neurovasculature and the Purpose of Sensitive Snouts

Articles on dinosaur neurovasculature are like buses: you wait for most of the Phanerozoic for one to arrive and then two appear at once. Indeed, 2017 saw the publication of two articles relating to the purpose of cephalic neurovasculature in theropod dinosaurs, the subject being only briefly highlighted in a select few cases from disparate Mesozoic reptiles. Thanks to micro-focus computed tomography (μCT), our discovery of complex internal canals within the rostrum (snout) of Neovenator…

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208-million-year-old giant amphibian discovered in Greenland

A new species of Cyclotosaur, a giant salamander-like amphibian, has been described from the Late Triassic rocks of East Greenland. Cyclotosaurs are temnospondyl amphibians, known from other Late Triassic deposits in Germany, Poland and Svalbard, but this new specimen represents the North-westerly-most ever found. The new species, described in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, is named Cyclotosaurus naraserluki, after the Greenlandic word for amphibian/salamander, ‘naraserluk’, and is represented by a complete skull and three vertebrae.…

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The Trump War on Science: EPA budget cuts, More on climate change, The war on wildlife and other recent stories

Another couple of weeks’ worth of stories about how science is faring under the Donald Trump regime. If I’m missing anything important, please let me know either in the comments or at my email jdupuis at yorku dot ca. If you want to use a non-work email for me, it’s dupuisj at gmail dot com. The selections are by no means meant to represent a comprehensive account of everything written about science over the last…

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#426 Everybody Poops

This week on Science for the People, everybody poops! And everybody pees. But we probably don't spend a lot of time thinking about exactly how that works. Well, put down your lunch and listen up. We're talking with David Chu, a pediatric urological surgeon about urine. Then we'll hear from his brother, Daniel Chu, who's a colorectal surgeon, about poop. Finally, we'll hear from IgNobel prize winner Patricia Yang about her work studying the flow…

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Episode 77: South American Gomphotheres

The proboscideans are a group of animals that contains the elephant and mastodont families. Many of us will be well-aware of these groups, but what of some of the lesser-known proboscideans? One such family are the gomphotheres and in this episode we’re introduced to them by Dr Dimila Mothé, of the Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. My first time in a paleontological collection, at the Pontifícia Universidade Católica of Minas Gerais, Brazil.…

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Around the Web: A quick list of readings on “predatory” open access journals

As a kind of quick follow up to my long ago post on Some perspective on “predatory” open access journals (presentation version, more or less, here and very short video version here) and in partial response to the recent What I learned from predatory publishers, I thought I would gather a bunch of worthwhile items here today. Want to prepare yourself to counter panic around predatory open access journals? Here’s some great places to start.…

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#425 Cooperative Microbes

This week, we're looking at some of the ways bacteria cooperate with other organisms to break down plants. First we speak with Dr. Lisa Karr, Associate Professor of Animal Science at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and get into the details of how rabbits and cows ferment their food. And Mark Stumpf-Allen, Compost Programs Coordinator for the City of Edmonton, has some practical tips to help you keep your compost pile and soil alive and happy.

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