Radarclinometry

In starting to write the SOAR-E grant proposal to attain RADARSAT-2 images over Iran, Catherine e-mailed me her 2008 paper that uses an Iranian salt diapir as a case study.  Originally the article was just so I could get the diapir coordinates, but I started to read it and found it quite interesting.Radar topography of domes on planetary surfaces by Neish et al. (2008) introduced me to the technique of radarclinometry, which is to use radar images…

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Academic CV Tricks

I’ve been reading a lot of academic curricula vita (CVs) recently. By “CV” I mean the academic-everything-you’ve-ever-done document, not the one or two page please-hire-me document that is called a resume in North America but a CV elsewhere. (This page from UBC covers the differences nicely. See also my earlier post on converting a CV to a resume.) I’ve been reading CVs because I’m on committees involved in faculty searches and scientist awards. This means…

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L’année 2016 au-dessus de la prévision centrale des modèles du GIEC

Originally posted on global-climat: En 2016, l’anomalie de température globale a atteint +0,99°C au-dessus de la période 1951-1980, selon la NASA. Cela nous conduit au-dessus de la prévision centrale des modèles du Groupe d’experts intergouvernemental sur l’évolution du climat (GIEC). Quelle portée…

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From one desert to another

With the intent of returning to the image misregistration issue once I'm back from Québec, I've been switching gears into proposal-writing mode.Catherine and I have discussed the possibility of extending our work to compare and contrast our Axel Heiberg Island diapirs to those in the Zagros Mountains, Iran. I have frequently referred to Axel Heiberg Island as "having the second highest concentration of salt diapirs in the world".  Well, Iran has the first-highest concentration of…

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Genetic algorithms and galactic empires

I had my most-ever-popular tweet last week: Don't see a lot of arxiv papers with "humanity's ultimate goal of a galactic empire" in the abstract but here's one: https://t.co/bqhw2xixbm— Pauline Barmby (@PBarmby) February 2, 2017 The “galactic empire” bit obviously caught some attention! So what is the paper by Fung, Lewis, and Wu of the University of Sydney, titled “The optimisation of low-acceleration interstellar relativistic rocket trajectories using genetic algorithms” all about? Figuring out how…

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New Year and Fresh Starts

Hello everyone, and Happy New Year!I'm back at Western after a wonderful winter break with my family in Vancouver.Some general house-keeping:In my first week back, I've been doing some general "house keeping" with my data.  I'm getting myself organized by deleting duplicate and unwanted files from awry processing.  I think it is a common problem: if you are trying a new tool in ArcGIS, are processing a new dataset, or input the wrong variable, you…

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2016 American Geophyical Union Fall Meeting

Hi hi~I am very grateful to have had the opportunity to attend the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in December.  It was a great experience to meet new people, reconnect with colleagues,attend career development workshops, learn about the cutting edge of geology, geophysics, and planetary science, and have the opportunity to present my own research.This post may seem lengthy, but I'm also partially writing it as a means to refresh myself with all the events…

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What is astronomy good for, anyway?

Big universities have staff members whose jobs it is to help professors get grants — whether by finding the right programs for their research, introducing researchers to potential partners, or sorting out the seemingly-endless paperwork. These folks often have graduate degrees and research backgrounds, so they know what research is. Like most people, they have a general idea of what astronomers study: stars and planets and stuff like that. But we often have to try…

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The strange world of the NSERC Discovery Grant

It’s 2017, which means that I have to start thinking about submitting an NSERC Discovery Grant proposal in the fall. For Canadian astronomers, this is a pretty high-stakes operation. These grants are our research-funding bread-and-butter since there aren’t many alternative sources of funding: there are no regular sources of funding from our space agency, for example. It’s a big source of anxiety (for me at least) because a Discovery Grant is more like a hybrid…

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More galaxies!

Back in October, there were a number of news stories with headlines like “The Universe Has 10 Times More Galaxies Than Scientists Thought”, “We Were Very Wrong About the Number of Galaxies in the Universe” “Two Trillion!” –The New Hubble Estimate of the Number of Galaxies in the Universe These stories were based on this press release which in turn describes the paper “The Evolution of Galaxy Number Density at z < 8 and its…

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