Math-based street art at Art Rapture in Vancouver, Canada; a mathematics lecture in Toronto; and Science Literacy Week in Canada

This is another one of my roundups. The focus is mostly mathematics. Art Rapture 2017 September 22 – 23, 2017 Mark Ollinger claims to be presenting math-influenced street art at Vancouver’s 2017 Art Rapture in a Sept. 12, 2017 article by Joanna Riquett for the Daily Hive, … Tell us about your style, how would you describe it?  My work is very much based in mathematics, I come up with what I would call formulas…

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Yarns that harvest and generate energy

The researchers involved in this work are confident enough about their prospects that they will be  patenting their research into yarns. From an August 25, 2017 news item on Nanowerk, An international research team led by scientists at The University of Texas at Dallas and Hanyang University in South Korea has developed high-tech yarns that generate electricity when they are stretched or twisted. In a study published in the Aug. 25 [2017] issue of the…

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Meet the Editor: Prof. Ian Townend, <i>Anthropocene Coasts</i>

The Canadian Science Publishing family of journals grew this year with the introduction of Anthropocene Coasts, a new international, interdisciplinary open access journal.  Founding co-editor Prof. Ian Townend (University of Southampton) shared with us how global perspectives of how humans are impacting coastal ecosystems are needed to inform social, economic, and legal processes.  Welcome aboard! What is your favourite feature of coastal regions? Being there. I like the contrasts between the tranquil and the raging…

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For first time: high-dimensional quantum encryption performed in real world city conditions

Having congratulated China on the world’s first quantum communication network a few weeks ago (August 22, 2017 posting), this quantum encryption story seems timely. From an August 24, 2017 news item on phys.org, For the first time, researchers have sent a quantum-secured message containing more than one bit of information per photon through the air above a city. The demonstration showed that it could one day be practical to use high-capacity, free-space quantum communication to…

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Celebrating Peer Review Week 2017

By Colin Guthrie, Ph.D. This week we’ve been celebrating Peer Review Week, a time to salute and discuss the sometimes controversial process that remains an important cornerstone of scientific research. The theme of the week this year is Transparency in Review.  What does the word transparency mean in the context of peer review? Peer review is a process that has traditionally taken place behind the curtain. It’s a process that usually happens anonymously: the reviewer…

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“Innovation and its enemies” and “Science in Wonderland”: a commentary on two books and a few thoughts about fish (2 of 2)

Part 1 featured my commentary on both Calestous Juma’s 2016 book, ”Innovation and Its Enemies; Why People Resist New Technologies” and Meanie Keene’s 2015 book, “Science in Wonderland; The scientific fairy tales of Victorian Britain.” Now for an emerging technology; genetically modified fish (AquAdvantage salmon) and my final comments on the books and the contrasting ways  the adoption of new technologies and science is presented. Fish AquAdvanage salmon features as one of Calestous Juma’s contemporary…

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What’s in a Name?

By Jenny Crick In science there are always icons, household names. Some are ubiquitous; most people could quote Einstein’s most famous formula, even if they couldn’t tell you what it actually means. Others are more niche; the name Barbara McClintock, who first recognized that genes could "jump" into new positions within a genome, would be instantly familiar to a geneticist, though maybe not to the world at large. Within each field of science, certain names take…

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Vancouver’s (Canada) Fringe Festival (Sept. 7 – 17, 2017) and science

A lot of writers feel the need to comment when art and science are brought together in various artistic/scientific works. Here’s Janet Smith in a Sept. 6, 2017 article about science at Vancouver’s 2017 Fringe Festival for the Georgia Straight, Science and art are often seen as opposites [emphasis mine], but they seem to be intermingling like never before at this year’s Vancouver Fringe Festival. Experimental cancer treatments, zoology lectures, cryogenically frozen heads: they’re just…

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Conflict of Pinterest: Is Social Media a Conflict of Interest Source in Academic Peer Review?

By Jeff Clements, Ph.D. In 1665, the concept of scholarly peer review was introduced by Henry Oldenburg, the founding editor of the scientific journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society —a highly regarded journal that continues to publish high-quality science today. In general, the process of peer review involves submitting one’s work to scrutiny by topical experts in a given field of research. Such a process is meant to serve a gatekeeping function, preventing the propagation of…

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Art in the details: A look at the role of art in science—a Sept. 19, 2017 Café Scientifiqueevent in Vancouver, Canada

The Sept. 19, 2017 Café Scientifique event, “Art in the Details A look at the role of art in science,” in Vancouver seems to be part of a larger neuroscience and the arts program at the University of British Columbia. First, the details about the Sept. 13, 2017 event from the eventful Vancouver webpage, Café Scientifique – Art in the Details: A look at the role of art in science Art in the Details: A…

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