A jellyfish chat on November 28, 2017 at Café Scientifique Vancouver get together

Café Scientifique Vancouver sent me an announcement (via email) about their upcoming event, We are pleased to announce our next café which will happen on TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28TH at 7:30PM in the back room of YAGGER'S DOWNTOWN (433 W Pender). JELLYFISH – FRIEND, FOE, OR FOOD? Did you know that in addition to stinging swimmers, jellyfish also cause extensive damage to fisheries and coastal power plants? As threats such as overfishing, pollution, and climate change…

Continue reading


Colour: an art/science open call for submissions

The submission deadline for this open ‘art/sci’ call is January 17, 2018 (from a November 29, 2017 Art/Science Salon announcement; received via email), COLOUR: WHAT DO YOU MEAN BY THAT? An exhibition exploring colour as a phenomenon that crosses the boundaries of the arts and sciences. Artists and designers revel in, and seek to understand, the visceral, physical and ephemeral qualities of colour. Sir Isaac Newton began his scientific experiments with light and prisms as…

Continue reading


Could CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) be weaponized?

On the occasion of an American team’s recent publication of research where they edited the germline (embryos), I produced a three-part series about CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats), sometimes referred to as CRISPR/Cas9, (links offered at end of this post). Somewhere in my series, there’s a quote about how CRISPR could be used as a ‘weapon of mass destruction’ and it seems this has been a hot topic for the last year or…

Continue reading


Women in Physics: Dr. Renee Horton

This post is part of an ongoing series by Jenny Kliever about women in physics who have inspired others and contributed to the field in unique and impressive ways. The Canadian Journal of Physics will be publishing a special issue on women in physics in 2018. Keep up to date on all CJP activities by signing up for the CJP newsletter. As a child growing up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Renee Horton spent many nights…

Continue reading


World heritage music stored in DNA

It seems a Swiss team from the École Polytechnique de Lausanne (EPFL) have collaborated with American companies Twist Bioscience and Microsoft, as well as, the University of Washington (state) to preserve two iconic jazz pieces on DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) according to a Sept. 29, 2017 news item on phys.org,, Thanks to an innovative technology for encoding data in DNA strands, two items of world heritage – songs recorded at the Montreux Jazz Festival [held in Switzerland]…

Continue reading


Art/science events in Vancouver, Canada (Nov. 22, 2017) and Toronto (Dec. 1, 2017)

The first event I’m highlighting is the Curiosity Collider Cafe’s Nov. 22, 2017 event in Vancouver (Canada), from a November 14, 2017 announcement received via email, Art, science, & neuroscience. Visualizing/sonifying particle collisions. Colors from nature. Sci-art career adventure. Our #ColliderCafe is a space for artists, scientists, makers, and anyone interested in art+science. Meet, discover, connect, create. Are you curious? Join us at “Collider Cafe: Art. Science. Interwoven.” to explore how art and science intersect…

Continue reading


A cheaper way to make artificial organs

In the quest to develop artificial organs, the University of British Columbia (UBC) is the not the first research institution that comes to my mind. It seems I may need to reevaluate now that UBC (Okanagan) has announced some work on bio-inks and artificial organs in a Sept. 12, 2017 news  release (also on EurekAlert) by Patty Wellborn,, A new bio-ink that may support a more efficient and inexpensive fabrication of human tissues and organs…

Continue reading


Giving security the finger

A Sept. 19, 2017 Michigan State University news release (also on EurekAlert) describes the research in more detail, Do you know how safe it is to use your finger as a security login? And have you wondered how your cell phone knows if your finger is real or a fake? Michigan State University biometric expert Anil Jain and his team are working to answer these questions and solve the biggest problems facing fingerprint recognition systems…

Continue reading


Mind the (Detection) Gap: Tracking Fish Across Coral Reef Habitats

The location of fishes can be tracked using underwater listening stations. But is the detection of electronically tagged fish by these stations equal across habitats? In their new publication in Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Nick Farmer and Jerry Ault develop a statistical method to account for gaps in tag detection. Read on to learn about their multi-year study in one of Florida’s marine protected areas.  By Nick Farmer and Jerry Ault Located…

Continue reading


Cellulose- and chitin-based biomaterial to replace plastics?

Although the term is not actually used in the news release, one of the materials used to create a new biomaterial could safely be described as nanocellulose. From a Sept. 20, 2017 Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) news release (also on EurekAlert) by Jeff Mulhollem, An inexpensive biomaterial that can be used to sustainably replace plastic barrier coatings in packaging and many other applications has been developed by Penn State researchers, who predict its adoption…

Continue reading