From Our Own Borealis Blog

Turning science into stories: the craft of Ed Yong

By Robert Gooding-Townsend, Science in Society Co-editor Last October, at the height of the American presidential election, the internet was […]

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Water Is…

“Water Is… a treasure trove of insights. How wonderful to see water from so many different perspectives in one very enjoyable book! I will be dipping in for many years to come.” —Tristan Gooley, bestselling author of How to Read Water       Tristan Gooley is a writer, navigator and explorer.  The only living person to have both flown solo and sailed single-handed across the Atlantic, he teaches people how to use the sun,…

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New Zealand declares The Whanganui River a Person

The Whanganui River Since 1840, when the New Zealand indigenous Māori ceded sovereignty to British colonists in the Treaty of Waitangi, the Whanganui iwi have tried and failed to have New Zealand’s third longest river acknowledged as a “living whole” with its own rights and autonomy, rather than treating it from a perspective of ownership and management. The iwi—like the indigenous peoples of Canada, who view water as alive (Nibi onje biimaadiiziiwin)—are spiritually connected to…

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Mathematics/Music/Art/Architecture/Education/Culture: Bridges 2017 conference in Waterloo, Canada

Bridges 2017 will be held in Waterloo, Canada from July 27 – 31, 2017. Here’s the invitation which was released last year, To give you a sense of the range offered, here’s more from Bridges 2017 events page, Every Bridges conference includes a number of events other than paper presentations. Please click on one of the events below to learn more about it. UWAG Exhibition The University of Waterloo Art Gallery (UWAG) has partnered with…

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Coverage and contamination in our DNA-uptake dataset

We finally have the corrected reference genome sequences for our DNA uptake deep-sequencing data.  The genome sequences from NCBI had errors and polymorphisms relative to the specific strains we used in the experiments, so the former post-doc used the sequence data from this experiment to create reference sequences that perfectly match the DNAs we used.The bright-coloured table below shows 8 of our 16 samples.  These are the samples that examined uptake of DNA from strain…

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Coverage and contamination in our DNA-uptake dataset

We finally have the corrected reference genome sequences for our DNA uptake deep-sequencing data.  The genome sequences from NCBI had errors and polymorphisms relative to the specific strains we used in the experiments, so the former post-doc used the sequence data from this experiment to create reference sequences that perfectly match the DNAs we used.The bright-coloured table below shows 8 of our 16 samples.  These are the samples that examined uptake of DNA from strain…

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Addressing British Columbia’s Biggest Water Challenges in a Changing Climate

Photo Credits: Miroslav Volek The report discusses “climate change and shifting hydrological conditions” placing British Columbia (BC) “into an increasingly uncertain water future.” (1) Rosie Simms and Oliver M. Brandes have identified five water challenges in the province: “building resilience to drought and floods; sustaining water for nature; understanding the state of British Columbia’s watersheds; protecting water quality for drinking, swimming, and fishing; and reconciling the water energy nexus.” (1) Their report identifies ways of…

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Weekend reads

It is Friday again - time for another batch of papers to read over the weekend. Thanks to a very active community there is never a shortage of studies to chose from.Controls on eDNA movement in streams: Transport, Retention, and ResuspensionAdvances in detection of genetic material from species in aquatic ecosystems, including environmental DNA (eDNA), have improved species monitoring and management. eDNA from target species can readily move in streams and rivers and the goal…

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Right Turn: Are your kids bored yet? Turn to these summer science distractions

After 10 months of preparing lunches, doing homework, attending dance, hockey, piano lessons (or feel free to insert whatever else fits), the unstructured, lazy, hazy days of summer are a welcome relief. Until they aren’t anymore. If your little person or tween is in serious need of some distraction, here are some educational recommendations of the scientific variety. Let’s start with podcasts. I found Brains On (“features science for kids and curious adults”) myself, but…

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