GPS et sens de l’orientation

Chronique science du 11 août sur CIBL. À force de trop souvent se laisser guider par eux, les GPS ont un effet néfaste sur notre cerveau. Des chercheurs ont comparé le fonctionnement de l’hippocampe et du cortex préfrontal, deux structures responsables du sens de l’orientation, lorsqu’on se dirige nous-mêmes dans un quartier labyrinthique ou lorsqu’on […]

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Humans Are the Product of Dynamic Processes on Multiple Time Scales

Today I want to talk about dynamic processes that occur on some very different time scales in the human nervous system. To do so, I will describe four examples very briefly, referring to the two graphics in this post. The first of these processes, represented at the bottom of each graphic, is the evolution of the human nervous system, which occurs on the longest of these time scales, measured in millions of years. Over these…

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Neuracademia : vulgariser les neurosciences avec les moyens d’aujourd’hui

De retour de la pause estivale, j’aimerais repartir cette semaine en vous parlant du projet Neuracademia, initiative de jeunes chercheurs et chercheuses suisses qui a pour objectif de « Mettre les neurosciences au service de tous! ». Tiens, tiens, ça me rappelle quelque chose ça… Ce n’est d’ailleurs pas le seul point commun avec le Cerveau à tous les niveaux. D’abord, le projet de la plateforme est ambitieux puisque huit grandes thématiques qui couvrent de…

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Five for fighting, three to six for mumps: Controlling disease outbreaks in the NHL (Part 1)

Editorial note: This piece was co-written by Atif Kukaswadia, PhD, and Ary Maharaj, M.Ed. Atif is a writer for the Public Health Perspectives blog on the PLOS network, and Ary is a writer for Silver Seven, an SBNation blog about the Ottawa Senators hockey team. This piece is being cross-published on both platforms. Enjoy! INTRODUCTION When we think of places for disease outbreaks, a few examples quickly come to mind: classrooms, college dorms, crowded trains.…

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What’s noise, what’s Illumina bias, and what’s signal?

The PhD student and I are trying to pin down the sources of variation in our sequencing coverage. It's critical that we understand this, because position-specific differences in coverage are how we are measuring differences in DNA uptake by competent bacteria.Tl;dr:  We see extensive and unexpected short-scale variation in coverage levels in both RNA-seq and DNA-based sequencing. Can anyone point us to resources that might explain this?I'm going to start not with our DNA-uptake data…

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Right Turn: Vacationing on Mars

Hi Loyal Readers, Happy summer! Thanks for your visits all year. I’m on vacation this week, but I thought I’d leave you with something anyway. Next week, I’ll provide some more details about the upcoming blog carnival taking place August 29th. I hope you’ll drop by to read all the interesting blogs and different points of view. No, I’m not vacationing on Mars, but maybe one day.   Our regular feature, Right Turn, appears every…

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Improve your health by swapping out sitting

Today’s post comes from Drs Annemarie Koster and Julianne van der Berg.  For more information on their work, please see the bottom of this post. Doing desk work, watching TV, commute. In daily life sitting is the most common behaviour. Unfortunately, sitting has been indicated as the new smoking, meaning that the current sedentary lifestyle has a highly negative impact on health. For example, we previously showed that more time spend in a sedentary position was…

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Paying Attention to Our Dogs

We can all learn when we decide to observe dogs in interaction with people.I think most people who use reward-based training methods do so for ethical reasons: they believe it’s the right way to train a dog. They also know it works.Science is on their side. A recent review of the literature on how people train pet dogs concluded that reward-based training is best for welfare reasons (and it works). Training dogs with aversive methods…

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Do the rpoD hypercompetence mutations eliminate the normal diauxic shift?

I've been going over the RNA-seq data for our rpoD1 hypercompetence mutant, looking for changes in gene expression that might help us understand why the mutation causes induction of the competence genes in rich medium.Here's a graph showing the results of DESeq2 analysis of the expression differences between the wildtype strain KW20 and rpoD1 cells at timepoints B1 and B2.  B1 is true log phase growth in rich medium; OD = 0.02.  B2 is OD…

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