Une étude sur la réaction du cerveau à l’isolement social va à l’encontre de cette pratique dans les prisons

Le nombre d’études fascinantes que je vois passer en sciences cognitives dépassant de loin ma capacité à en parler sur ce blogue, j’ai toujours une longue « liste d’attente » de sujets potentiels dans un fichier. Il n’est pas rare alors qu’un sujet d’actualité vu ou entendu dans les médias s’aligne parfaitement avec l’une de ces études en attente de diffusion et la sorte ainsi de l’ombre. C’est le cas cette semaine, avec comme élément…

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Une étude sur la réaction du cerveau à l’isolement social va à l’encontre de cette pratique dans les prisons

Le nombre d’études fascinantes que je vois passer en sciences cognitives dépassant de loin ma capacité à en parler sur ce blogue, j’ai toujours une longue « liste d’attente » de sujets potentiels dans un fichier. Il n’est pas rare alors qu’un sujet d’actualité vu ou entendu dans les médias s’aligne parfaitement avec l’une de ces études en attente de diffusion et la sorte ainsi de l’ombre. C’est le cas cette semaine, avec comme élément…

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Companion Animal Psychology News October 2018

The latest news including an evidence-based guide to pets, what it's like growing up with wolves, and anxiety in pets and us.Some of my favourites from around the web this monthThe Psychologist guide to … pets. I love these evidence-based tips on pets put together by Ella Rhodes.“Fido” or “Freddie”? Why do some pet names become popular? A fun and interesting post from Prof. Hal Herzog, complete with a quiz to test how popular your…

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A Short Petting Session Improves Wellbeing in Shelter Dogs

For shelter dogs, spending 15 minutes with a volunteer who will pet them when they want is beneficial according to both physiological and behavioural measures.Photo: ESB Basic / ShutterstockDogs in shelters may be deprived of human company. Can a short petting session help them feel better? A study published earlier this year by Dr. Ragen McGowan et. al. and published in Applied Animal Behaviour Science investigated the effects of petting from a stranger and found…

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How CRISPR is democratizing genetic testing

Image courtesy of Pixaby Scientists have enlisted the gene editing tool CRISPR in a hunt for cancer causing mutations, releasing into the open valuable data that could help doctors better advise their patients. A new study lists almost 4,000 individual “misspellings,” or variants, in the “breast cancer gene” BRCA1 and how likely each one is to cause disease. The vast majority of variants—3,000 of them—are new to public databases containing genetic test results from people…

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Le cerveau, comme la science, est prédictif (ou bayésien)

Il y a une façon de concevoir le cerveau de plus en plus répandue en sciences cognitives, celle d’une machine à faire des prédictions. L’approche du « cerveau prédictif » (« predictive processing », en anglais) constitue ni plus ni moins qu’un changement de paradigme majeur par rapport à la vieille analogie cerveau-ordinateur du cognitivisme des années ’70, par exemple. Non le cerveau n’attend pas passivement ses «inputs» pour «traiter des représentations symboliques» et produire…

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THE GENE: one reader’s reflection on a review of the history of genetics

Mukherjee, S. (2016). THE GENE: An Intimate History. New York, New York: Scribner. While it’s been years since I’ve been in school or academia, I can’t help but feel nostalgic this time of year, when fall marks the beginning of a new year (and the return of the pumpkin spice latte, mmm!). Many of you are hunkering down in your courses, starting new projects (or trying to put a fresh look on an old one),…

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Do Dogs and Cats Get Along? Ask the Cat!

Dogs and cats living together get along most of the time, but it’s the cat’s level of comfort with the dog that is the defining factor, according to research.Photo: Plastique/ShutterstockWith 94.2 million pet cats and 89.7 million pet dogs in the US, it’s inevitable that some dogs and cats live together. While we don’t know how many households have both a dog and a cat, scientists Jessica Thomson, Dr. Sophie Hall and Prof. Daniel Mills…

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SBRN Membership Survey

Regular readers of Obesity Panacea will be well acquainted with the Sedentary Behaviour Research Network (SBRN).  As the name suggests it is a network of researchers and clinicians interested in the health impact of sedentary behaviour. Membership is free, and there are now 1,500+ SBRN members worldwide (Disclosure: I am a founding member, and actively involved in SBRN projects). The most recent large SBRN project was the Terminology Consensus Project, which developed consensus-based definitions of…

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The Neuronal Traces of Our Conceptual Memories

Much has been written on the question of how our memories are physically represented in our brains. In this post, I discuss two answers that have been competing with each other, so to speak, for a number of years. In very general terms, according to one of these answers, our memories are distributed across vast populations of neurons, numbering in the millions (out of the roughly 16 billion neurons in the cortex as a whole).…

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